Anderson-Baum Cabin

Status: Demolished

Year Listed: 2004

Location: Whatcom County

Charlie Anderson, prospector, woodsman, and shingle mill worker, built his one-room, hand-hewn cabin adjacent to the North Fork of the Nooksack River in the 1920s during the Mt. Baker Gold Rush years. After Charlie died, his long-time friend Jerry Bourn took up residence in the cabin until his death in 1980. Both men represent typical early pioneers and miners in the North Cascades from the 1890s to 1930s, during which time 5,000 mining claims were filed within the North Fork Nooksack Mining District. Charlie’s cabin is one of the few tangible remnants within the mining district, which once consisted of a flume system, tent cities, small town sites, roads, and trails linking it with civilization in the town of Glacier. The style of the Anderson-Bourn Cabin was once prevalent throughout the North Cascades, but it is now the only hewn log structure standing today in fair condition in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Fores

National Guard of Washington Armory

Status: In the works!

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Whatcom County

Built in 1910, the heavy masonry walls, crenellated parapet and rounded towers distinguish the Washington National Guard Armory as a site for military training. Both the National Guard and the Army Reserve used the facility full-time until 1953, when reduced training schedules allowed the National Guard to convert the main floor into a public roller-skating rink, which remained open until 1989

Old Granary Building

Status: In the works!

Year Listed: 2008

Location: Whatcom County

The Granary Building stands as a key part of Whatcom County’s early chicken and egg cooperative movement.  In the fall of 1915, a group of farmers formed an association that ultimately led to the organization of the Washington Cooperative Egg and Poultry Association.  By 1920, Whatcom County’s chicken population exceeded every other county in the West except one in California.  Today, the Granary Building creates a distinct silhouette in downtown Bellingham’s skyline and is architecturally notable as an agricultural building form co-existing within an urban/industrial working waterfront setting.  The Granary Building has been determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

BNSF Depot

Status: Watch List

Year Listed: 2012

Location: Whatcom County

The first train pulled up to the Blaine Depot in 1909, providing a secondary means of accessing a city primarily served by maritime vessels until that time. The depot played an important role in exporting the region’s resources and aiding in its economic growth. Vacant for the past 6 years, the Blaine Depot has been determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Responding to community concern, BNSF recently shelved demolition plans, allowing time to assess alternative scenarios. One idea gaining steam is to return passenger rail service to the City of Blaine. The plan is acquiring supporters, including the Cascadia Center for Regional Development and the City of Surrey, British Columbia. Failing the return of passenger service, a second plan under consideration would relocate the depot to serve as an anchor attraction at a nearby waterfront park.

Digester Building

Status: Demolished

Year Listed: 2013

Location: Whatcom County

The Digester Building is one of only four brick structures remaining at the former Georgia-Pacific pulp mill along Bellingham’s waterfront. Georgia-Pacific ceased all mill operations last decade, leaving the Digester Building as the most recognizable of the remaining historic industrial structures paying tribute to the original Puget Sound Pulp & Timber Company. The Port of Bellingham recently acquired the former mill site, and a 2008 Port-commissioned study resulted in a determination that ten of the historic mill buildings on site were eligible as a National Register historic district. Yet, the same study concluded most of the structures were incompatible with the new vision and questioned the economic feasibility of integrating the former mill buildings within the proposed mixed use waterfront redevelopment.